Writing

Names in fiction

 

 

Image result for characters in book

 

 

The more I read, the more I realise that the characters’ names play an important role in stories. There is a special moment when characters introduce themselves, and when others respond. When the name has a significance, this moment becomes exceptional and impressive.

In real life, we, sometimes, pause and stare at the person introducing himself or herself, and feel something special, real, or odd about them.

One day, a friend was telling me about her sister’s newborn baby;

‘Shadow was doing so and so,’ she said, and I asked whether her sister is living in the Uk?

‘No,’ she said.

‘What’s the baby’s name again?’ I asked.

‘Shadow,’ she said.

‘Why your sister gave her baby an English name?’ I asked.

‘It’s Shadow, the Arabic name,’ she replied.

I couldn’t help laughing because Shadow in Arabic means the birds’ singing, the pronunciation is different, slightly, but it spells the same as the shadow in English.

It is interesting to play with this similarity of names in Fiction, isn’t it?

Wishing you all the best,

Nahla

 

 

 

life, Writing

Usury

 

 

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In Islam, usury is forbidden. It’s an unfair deal to exploit people in need and lend them money on the condition that s/she will pay back double or ten doubles.

But what if usuary was not about money?

I’ve just read this quote by Shams Tabrizi;

“Usuary is permissible in love. So, when one gives you some love, give it back double.”

Or more!

Wishing you all the best,

Nahla

 

 

Drama, Writing

Ayla

 

Image result for ayla turkish movie

 

 

 

Ayla is a 2017 Turkish movie; tells the story of a Turkish sergeant and a Korean little girl.  It is based on a true story happened during the Korean War.

It’s about humanity and pure love. One night, when the moon was full, the sergeant found a little girl, terrified, shaking, not just of the freezing cold but also of the disaster, the inhumane massacre surrounded her fragile little frame.

A stranger, with a different tongue and a kind heart, became the girl’s papa. He saved her, cared about her, and never abandoned her. And she understood him, trusted him, and even loved him as her real papa.

But when the mission ended, the sergeant had to go back to his country, and by law, the little girl could not leave with him.

Did she forget her foreign papa? Did he forget the daughter of war? Never.

Fate brought them back together after sixty years.

It reminded me of I’m David movie by Paul Feig; wonderful stories with beautiful messages.

It’s available on Youtube, but with no English subtitles.

Herewith snaps of the movie, hope you will enjoy it.

Wishing you all the best,

Nahla

 

Fiction, Writing

The Captain’s daughter

One day I took my daughter to the local library to get a new book. She picked two, and it was my turn to choose mine. It was The last Pearl by Leah Fleming that caught my sight.

It was the first time to know about Fleming or read any of her books. It’s about a young woman, Greta’s journey in time and place. It’s about family, family poverty, family struggle, family failure, and family success. It’s about kindness, cruelty, misery, and happiness. And that’s the book I have been looking for.

Then I borrowed another book; The Captain’s Daughter. I expected to finish it by the end of the Christmas holiday, but I read it; done.

It’s the story of two Titanic survivors, two women that were destined to save the life of each other. It’s about kindness, friendship, family, motherhood, and humanity. If you’re interested in the setting of different countries, moving home, wartime, and relationships between different cultures and backgrounds, then this one is highly recommended.

And one more thing about the captain’s daughter, it explains how ‘the secrets in a woman’s heart are deeper than the ocean.

Have you read any of Leah Fleming’s books?

Wishing you all the best,

Nahla